Breadcrumb

Arab-Israeli Conflict

Lesson Author
Required Time Frame
One week: Three block classes or five non-block classes
Subject(s)
Grade Level(s)
Lesson Abstract
Students will make predictions on the recognition of Israel by President Truman and compare it to what actually occurred. Students will research the views of the Israelis and Palestinians on five different issues with a partner and each student will present their research.
Description

 

  • Students will review the background of the history of the conflict.
  • Students will read and evaluate primary sources.
  • Students will make predictions on the recognition of Israel by President Truman and compare it to what actually occurred.
  • Students will research the views of the Israelis and Palestinians on five different issues with a partner and each student will present information on the assigned viewpoint to the class.
  • Students will then be assigned in groups of five (one person per issue) to create a peace proposal to for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
Rationale (why are you doing this?)
  • The Arab Israeli Crisis is part of Unit 5 Conflict - specifically the genocides in the 20th century and crisis including India-Pakistan, Arab Israeli, and North and South Korea.
  • Students in International Baccalaureate schools are asked to think globally at the big picture. The learner profile attributes includes principled, inquirer, thinker, communicator, open-minded, caring, risk-taker, balanced, and reflective.  In this unit the students will be asked to look at use their attributes as principled, thinker, open-minded, risk-taker, inquirer, and reflective by people in history.
  • Viewing both points of view in the controversy of recognizing Israel as well as the Israeli and Palestinians views today will give them an opportunity to see there are many ideas that are available and have merit. Each decision and view can have expected and unexpected consequences.
  • Creating a peace proposal will allow the students to evaluate both points of view.
Lesson Objectives - the student will
  • Students will be able to understand the historical background of the Arab Israeli crisis
  • Student will analyze primary and secondary sources to understand how and why the United States chose to recognize the nation of Israel
  • Students will gather evidence using primary and secondary sources to create a profile on the view, either Israeli or Palestinian on specific issues within a cooperative group to present to the class
  • Students will evaluate the arguments presented with a cooperative group and create a peace proposal for the Middle East
  • Students will write end of class reflections on their opinions on decisions, views, and ideas presented in class.
District, state, or national performance and knowledge standards/goals/skills met

National performance and knowledge standards/goals/skills met:

 

 

Reading Standards for Reading In History

National Common Core

 

9th – 10th Grade

 

 

 

 

11-12th Grade

 

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information. (RH.9-10.1.)

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole. (RH.11-12.1.)

 

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text. (RH.9-10.2.)

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas. (RH.11-12.2.)

 

Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them. (RH.9-10.3.)

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain. (RH.11-12.3.)

 

 

Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts. (RH.9-10.6.)

Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence. (RH.11-12.6.)

 

Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources. (RH.9-10.9.)

Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources. (RH.11-12.9.)

 

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. (WHST.9-10.7.)

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. (WHST.11-12.7.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Standards for History- National Common Core

 

 

 

9 – 10th Grade

11- 12th Grade

 

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (WHST.9-10.9.)

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (WHST.11-12.9.)

 

Secondary materials (book, article, video documentary, etc.) needed
  • text book
  • The Middle East in Transition – The Questions for U.S. Policy. Watson Institute for International Studies. Brown University. 2011. http://www.choices.edu Downloadable e book available that gives teachers permission to use this in their own classes (not share with other teachers) and make copies for students. Downloads include a teacher’s edition and a student edition. Price – About $25.00
  • Harry S. Truman and the Recognition of Israel. Harry S. Truman Library Institute for National and International Affairs (Publication created to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the United States Recognition of Israel). 1998.
  • Benson, Michael.  Harry S. Truman as a Modern Cyrus. BYU Studies. Vol. 34, No. 1. 1994. https://ojs.lib.byu.edu/spc/index.php/BYUStudies/article/view/6165/5815 (you may view this on full screen, you are allowed to download a PDF copy).
  • “Background Material.” The Recognition of the State of Israel. Harry S. Truman Library and Museum. 
  • “Chronology.” The Recognition of the State of Israel. Harry S. Truman and Library Museum.
  • “Creation of Israel 1948.” Office of Historian. U.S. Department of State. (U. S. State Department’s point of view given as well as what “Truman decided.”)

http://history.state.gov/milestones/1945-1952/ArabIsraeliWar 

 

  • Database:  EBSCO Host – Points of View – Topic: Arab Israeli Conflict
  • Database:   SIRS Researcher – Arab Israeli Conflict

 

Primary sources needed (document, photograph, artifact, diary or letter, audio or visual recording, etc.) needed

Suggested materials – teachers should probably excerpt for younger students.  In three days, you will not have time for all of the sources. Make excerpts from a variety of sources or choose a few that appeal to you.

 

  • Clifford, Clark with Richard Holbrooke. President Truman’s Decision to Recognize Israel.1991.Think  

Israel. May June 2011. http://www.think-israel.org/clifford.trumanrecognizesisrael.html

 

 

 

 

Israeli – Palestinian Conflict - Background – Primary and Secondary Sources

 

Excerpt from “The Jewish State and Jewish Problem”

 

In the West, in lands of emancipation, their material condition is not particularly bad, but the moral trouble is serious: They want to take full advantage of their rights, and cannot; they long to become attached to the people of the country, and to take part in its social life, and they are kept at arm’s length; they strive after love and brotherhood, and are met by looks of hatred and contempt on all sides; conscious that they are not inferior to their neighbors in any kind of ability or virtue, they have it continually thrown in their teeth that they are an inferior type, and are not fit to rise to the same level as the Aryans. …   In order to escape from all these troubles it is necessary to establish a Jewish State.

 

1897 – Ahad Ha’am

 

Ha’am, A. “The Jewish State and the Jewish Problem.” Jewish Virtual Library. The American Israeli Cooperative Enterprise. 2013. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Zionism/haam2.html

 

How does the quote above show a motivation for many Jews to want a Jewish State?

 

 

 

The 1937 summary report of the Palestine Royal Commission (aka the Peel Commission) conducted at the request of the British Government, contained the following:

 

"Under the stress of the [First] World War the British Government made promises to Arabs and Jews in order to obtain their support. On the strength of those promises both parties formed certain expectations... An irrepressible conflict has arisen between two national communities within the narrow bounds of one small country. There is no common ground between them. Their national aspirations are incompatible. The Arabs desire to revive the traditions of the Arab golden age. The Jews desire to show what they can achieve when restored to the land in which the Jewish nation was born. Neither of the two national ideals permits of combination in the service of a single Stat