Breadcrumb

New York, NY

Harry S. Truman Lecture at Columbia University on the Witch-Hunting and Hysteria

Harry S. Truman presents the third of a series of William Radner Lectures at Columbia University, New York, New York. The subject is witch-hunting and hysteria in the United States (examples are Salem Witch Trials, Alien-Sedition Act, Joseph McCarthy). Lindsay Rogers, Burgess Professor of Public Law, presided and moderated the discussion between student panelists and the former President after the lecture. Dean John G. Palfrey of Columbia College closed the series.

Harry S. Truman Lecture at Columbia University on the Constitution

Harry S. Truman presents the second of a series of William Radner Lectures at Columbia University in New York, New York. The subject is the Constitution. Philip C. Jessup, Hamilton Fish, Professor of International Law and Diplomacy at Columbia University and Ambassador at Large in the Truman administration, presided at this session and moderated the discussion between a panel of students from the college and the former President after he had spoken. Reel 1 contains the opening remarks and the lecture; reel 2 contains the discussion. Reel 1: Length, 32 min.Reel 2: Length, 23 min. 34 sec.

Harry S. Truman Lecture at Columbia University on the Presidency

Harry S. Truman presents the first of a series of William Radner Lectures at Columbia University in New York, New York. John G. Palfrey, Dean of Columbia College, presided. Grayson Kirk, President of Columbia University, extended the university's welcome to former President Truman. Reel 1 contains the opening remarks and the lecture. Reel 2 contains the discussion which followed the lecture. The subject is the Presidency of the United States.Reel 1: Length, 32 min.Reel 2: Length, 23 min. 34 sec.

President Truman, Address at Dorrance Brooks Park, Harlem, New York

President Harry S. Truman's address at Dorrance Brooks Park, Harlem, New York, upon receiving the Franklin Roosevelt Award, October 11, 1952, 2:00 p.m. He mentions achievements in civil rights, as well as Adlai Stevenson's presidential campaign and support of civil rigihts. Transcript available in Public Papers of the Presidents, Harry S. Truman, 1952.