Breadcrumb

  1. Home
  2. Educational Resources
  3. Teacher Lesson Plans
  4. Andrew and Martin: A Decade Apart, Yet Little has Changed

Andrew and Martin: A Decade Apart, Yet Little has Changed

Lesson Author
Subject(s)
Lesson Abstract
Students will compare past and present examples of child segregation faced by two African-Americans. One is a recollection of an account by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This account occurred in 1935 when Dr. King was six-year-old. The second account takes place in the present, shared by Andrew S. Evans. This account occurred in 1949 when Evan is eleven-year-old.
Description

Students will compare past and present examples of child segregation faced by two African-Americans.  One is a recollection of an account by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This account occurred in 1935 when Dr. King was six-year-old.  The second account takes place in the present, shared by Andrew S. Evans. This account occurred in 1949 when Evan is eleven-year-old.

Students will collaborate to create a three voice poem between Andrew S. Evans, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  and Dr. King’s mother, Alberta King. Students will compose a three - four stanza poem. The poem will begin with the voice of Dr. King then move to Andrew followed by Mrs. Alberta King’s response to Dr. King and Andrew.  Mrs. King’s response is based on the conversation young Martin had with his mother following his experience of child segregation.

Rationale (why are you doing this?)

Segregation was not limited to only southern states, but it occurred across the country.  Our nation’s capital, Washington, D.C., also took part in segregated acts.

Lesson Objectives - the student will

For African-Americans, the struggles for freedom, equality and fairness would not end with the Emancipation Proclamation.  Their struggles would continue for decades, spanning generations.

African American children were not immune to receiving hurtful words and actions by those who supported segregation. 

The fight for freedom, equality and fairness is not limited to adults.  Children would also take part in the fight.

District, state, or national performance and knowledge standards/goals/skills met

Standard 1. History

2. People in the past influence the development and interaction of different communities or regions

Standard 4: Civics

Respecting the views and rights of others is a key component of a democratic society.

Secondary materials (book, article, video documentary, etc.) needed

Mapping Segregation in Washington D.C. How Racially Restricted Housing Shaped Ward 4

Primary sources needed (document, photograph, artifact, diary or letter, audio or visual recording, etc.) needed

1.  Letter from Andrew S. Evans to President Truman, 1949 —- National Archives Foundation

htpps://archivesfoundation.org/amendingamerica/letter-andrew-s-evans-president-truman/

2.  BBC Face to Face Martin Luther King Jr. interview 1961 from Kenyanese —- play from 3:58 - 5:50

Fully describe the activity or assignment in detail. What will both the teacher and the students do?

Students will compare past and present examples of child segregation faced by two African-Americans. One is a recollection of an account by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This account occurred in 1935 when Dr. King was six-year-old. The second account takes place in the present, shared by Andrew S. Evans. This account occurred in 1949 when Evan is eleven-year-old.


Students will collaborate to create a three voice poem between Andrew S. Evans, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Dr. King’s mother, Alberta King. Students will compose a three - four stanza poem. The poem will begin with the voice of Dr. King then move to Andrew followed by Mrs. Alberta King’s response to Dr. King and Andrew. Mrs. King’s response is based on the conversation young Martin had with his mother following his experience of child segregation.

Day one

Independently read Andrew S. Evans letter. While reading, underline or circle text that stands out to you. (10 minutes). Small group discussion will follow in which students will share the text they circled and explain why. (15 minutes). A whole class discussion will then follow. Make sure that the year and city from which the letter is written is part of the discussion. Ask students, “Does it matter that this letter is written from a young boy living in Washington, D.C.? What do we/you know about Washington, D.C.?”

Have students think about the month and year the letter was written. Does it matter that it is 1949 and a young boy is explaining to the President of the United States that he is not allowed to play on the public school playground that is three yards away from his home? Look at the month in which the letter is written. Andrew writes this letter in June. What is usually happening in the month of June? What do you usually do in June?

Day Two

Hand out excerpt from BBC “Face to Face” to students. Play only audio of interview. Play audio once again. This time, students will underline or circle text that stands out to him/her (5 minutes). Students will only focus on Dr. King’s experience, not his mother’s response. Follow -up with class discussion on what stood out and why. Ask students if there are any similarities between Dr. King and Andrew’s stories of child segregation? Differences?

Students will now watch and listen to the video of Dr. King’s interview. Students will be asked to pay close attention to Dr. King’s facial expressions and body language. What feelings/emotions do they reveal (tell us) that the written word and audio did not? Since we only have Andrew’s written letter, what might we be missing? If Andrew was interviewed, what do you think his facial expressions and body language would tell us?

Finally, students will listen to Dr. King’s one more time. Students will focus on the words spoken by Dr. King’s mother. After watching the video, students will highlight the most important in the text. Students will focus only on Mrs. King’s response in the text. Wrap up with a class discussion centered around the significance and value her words may have had on six-year-old Martin. What role do you think they played in Dr. King’s life over time?

Days Three and Four

Students will receive clean copies of Andrew’s letter, the excerpt from Dr. King’s interview and “Three Voice Poetry” graphic organizer.

Recount the examples of child segregation faced by two African-Americans. One is a recollection of an account by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This account occurred in 1935 when Dr. King was six-year-old. The second account takes place in the present, shared by Andrew S. Evans. This account occurred in 1949 when Evans is eleven-year-old. Students will organize their thinking in a middle, beginning and end format.

The beginning will represent the problem (the encounter). The middle will represent their reaction and the rising action (feelings/emotion and tension building). The end will represent the resolution (their response to the encounter).

Students will then move to Mrs. Alberta King’s conversation with Martin. They will decide which part of her conversation would best represent her response to the organization of Martin and Andrew’s account (beginning, middle and end).

In groups of 2 - 3, students will:

1. Reread and analyze the letter written from Andrew S. Evans to President Harry S. Truman in 1949. Circle key words and phrases to create voice one of a three voice poem

2. Organize key words and phrases into three to four stanzas. (beginning, middle, end)

3. Reread and analyze the excerpt from the one-on-one interview that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. did in 1961 with the BBC program “Face to Face”. Students will first focus on Dr. King’s account of his first memory of childhood segregation. Circle key words and phrases to create voice two of a three voice poem.

4. Organize key words and phrases into three to four stanzas. (beginning, middle, end).

5. Reread and analyze the excerpt from the one-on-one interview that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. did in 1961 with the BBC program “Face to Face”. Students will first focus on Mrs. Alberta King’s conversation she had with her young son Martin. Circle key words and phrases to create voice three of a three voice poem.

6. Organize key words and phrases into three to four stanzas. (beginning, middle, end).

7. Carefully look over the stanzas from both Evans, Dr. King and Mrs. Kingside by side. Make sure that the stanzas are arranged in a beginning, middle, format.

8. When writing (handwritten or typed) the final copy of the three voice poem, students will select three colors. One color representing Andrew S. Evans, a second color representing Dr. King and a third color representing Mrs. King.

9. St