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Recognition of Israel

Lesson Author
Required Time Frame
1 class day
Grade Level(s)
Lesson Abstract
Geography, the rise of the Middle East, and the recognition of Israel.
Description
  • In this lesson, students will use historical maps to track the developments in the Middle East and the rise of the state of Israel.  
  • Students visually track the geographic developments in the Middle East and the creation of Israel using historical maps.  
Rationale (why are you doing this?)
  • Many students lack historical and geographic knowledge of the Middle East.   
  • For every unit that I cover, I always use maps and map activities to reinforce the information being covered and provide the opportunity for students to develop geographic knowledge of the world around them.  
Lesson Objectives - the student will
  • The student will gain knowledge of the geography of the Middle East. 
  • The student will develop a brief understanding of the creation of Israel. 
  • The student will analyze primary sources and develop an educated opinion concerning the power struggles of the Middle Eastern history.  
District, state, or national performance and knowledge standards/goals/skills met
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.7 Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.8 Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claims.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.9 Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
Secondary materials (book, article, video documentary, etc.) needed

Assessment of Israel

Student Name:     ________________________________________

 

CATEGORY

4 –

Above Standards

3 - Meets Standards

2 – 

Approaching 

Standards

1 – 

Below 

Standards

 

 

Attention Grabber

The introductory paragraph has a strong hook or attention grabber that is appropriate for the audience. This could be a strong statement, a relevant quotation, statistic, or question addressed to the reader.

The introductory paragraph has a hook or attention grabber, but it is weak, rambling or inappropriate for the audience.

The author has an interesting introductory paragraph but the connection to the topic is not clear.

The introductory paragraph is not interesting AND is not relevant to the topic.

 

Position Statement

The position statement provides a clear, strong statement of the author\’s position on the topic.

The position statement provides a clear statement of the author\’s position on the topic.

A position statement is present, but does not make the author\’s position clear.

There is no position statement.

 

Focus or Thesis Statement

The thesis statement names the topic of the essay and outlines the main points to be discussed.

The thesis statement names the topic of the essay.

The thesis statement outlines some or all of the main points to be discussed but does not name the topic.

The thesis statement does not name the topic AND does not preview what will be discussed.

 

 

Support for Position

Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement.

Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement.

Includes 2 pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement.

Includes 1 or fewer pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences).

 

 

Evidence and Examples

All of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author\’s position.

Most of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author\’s position.

At least one of the pieces of evidence and examples is relevant and has an explanation that shows how that piece of evidence supports the author\’s position.

Evidence and examples are NOT relevant AND/OR are not explained.

 

Accuracy

All supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately.

Almost all supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately.

Most supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately.

Most supportive facts and statistics were inaccurately reported.

 

 

 

Sequencing

Arguments and support are provided in a logical order that makes it easy and interesting to follow the author\’s train of thought.

Arguments and support are provided in a fairly logical order that makes it reasonably easy to follow the author\’s train of thought.

A few of the support details or arguments are not in an expected or logical order, distracting the reader and making the essay seem a little confusing.

Many of the support details or arguments are not in an expected or logical order, distracting the reader and making the essay seem very confusing.

 

 

Sources

All sources used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and cited correctly.

All sources used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and most are cited correctly.

Most sources used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and cited correctly.

Many sources are suspect (not credible) AND/OR are not cited correctly.

 

 

History of the Middle East Map Activity                                                                              STUDENT NAME

Directions:  label the following locations on the various maps. 

You may use the attached historical maps or you may refer to your textbook for help. 

 

 

MAP #1:

CURRENT MIDDLE EAST

 

MAP #2: 

BIBLICAL MIDDLE EAST

MAP #3-7:

MIDDLE EAST IN ANCIENT EMPIRES

 

MAP #10:

MIDDLE EAST

IN MANDATE SYSTEM

MAP #11:

MIDDLE EAST

1948

Israel

Jerusalem

Map #3:

Assyrian Empire

Dates of

British Mandate

Israel

Egypt

Shade in Kingdom of Israel

Babylonian Empire

Dates of

French Mandate

Palestine

Jordan

Jericho

Map #4:

Persian Empire

Date of

Trans-Jordan

Amman

Saudi Arabia

River Jordan

Map #5:

Macedonian Empire

Dates of

Red Sea

Ramallah

Lebanon

Hebron

Map #6:

Roman Empire

Date of

 

West Bank

Syria

Damascus

Map #7:

Byzantine Empire

Dates of

 

Gaza Strip

Iraq

Dead Sea

Map #8:

Crusader Kingdoms

Dates of

 

Arab State:  Red

Jewish State:

Blue