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Colgan Home, 2650 East 29th Street; Mrs. Trow's boardinghouse, 1314 Troost Ave.; Mike Pendergast's 10th Ward Democratic Club, 2535 Prospect Boulevard

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In March 1905, when Truman's parents moved to a farm near Clinton, he moved in with his aunt, Emily Truman Colgan, who lived in a big new house only a short distance away at 2650 East 29th Street (pictured left). Truman greatly enjoyed the company of his two cousins, Myra and Mary Colgan (pictured below right) with whom he remained close throughout his life. "...They had the most hilarious time--those young people," another cousin, Mary Ethel Noland, remembered. "They loved to give parties and they loved practical jokes, and they would play the most outlandish jokes on each other." (Mary Ethel Noland oral history interview.)

Truman probably found the trip from the Colgan house to his job in downtown Kansas City rather long, and he soon moved closer to town, to the boardinghouse owned by Mrs. Trow at 1314 Troost Avenue, about 1/2 mile east of downtown Kansas City. He stayed with Mrs. Trow until the spring of 1906, when he quit his job in town and moved to his family's farm near Grandview. When in 1914 Truman began to be active politically in Grandview, he went back to his old neighborhood to attend Thursday night meetings at Mike Pendergast's 10th Ward Democratic Club, which met upstairs at 2535 Prospect Boulevard.